Tag Archives: new york

Indian Summer in the City

It may be mid-October, but today feels more like late summer in NYC. People are out in tank tops and short, enjoying the sun. Enjoy it while it lasts!

How I wish I could be basking in the sun like this guy

Mother Nature is a Rad Lady

If you missed tonight’s sunset and clouds in NYC you missed out. Never fear, I captured it all for you.

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That Fish is Too Big

Anyone who knows me knows that I love sea creatures. My favorite movies growing up were Splash and The Little Mermaid. I don’t now, nor have I ever eaten seafood or anything from the ocean including seaweed.

So, a while back, I was wandering through the Union Square Whole Foods and saw this fish (see below). My immediate thought was “That fish is too big! No one is going to buy that fish and it will all be a waste!” I’m not the only one who was astonished by the fish. More than a few other shoppers stopped to take pictures and laugh about the Too Big Fish.

A fish too big

A fish too big

Really though. Think about it. Would you want to be the person who asks for a slice off of an otherwise fully intact fish of that size? Part of his body is hanging off the ice! Wouldn’t you be worried about his freshness? This is the way my mind works. I wondered what Whole Foods was thinking with this marketing. Was there a reason why they displayed this whole rather than cut into easily purchasable steaks or fillets?

I don’t know what happened to the Too Big Fish, but I hope that he wasn’t wasted. If he had to be caught and put on ice, I hope someone made a nice dinner out of him.

Hell is the Subway

Sometimes the subway is hell. It may be hot, crowded or stinky. Last night was no exception (stinky) but apparently this car knew it well enough to self identify, as such.

Welcome to subway hell

Welcome to subway hell

Glass Skies

Something that strikes me about the landscape of New York city almost every day is the interaction of the urban landscape with its natural surroundings. It’s easy to get caught up in all the structures, construction and hustle and bustle. But, if you take the time to look around, the glass and metal of the city often offer wonderful reflections and views of the natural world around.

On blue skied days, I love how the glass buildings the ripple in the sunlight and mirror the clouds. In what is likely to be the first of many posts of the subject of the city versus nature, I’d like to share some of my favorite photos of the glass skies of New York.

Freedom Tower in blue

Freedom Tower in blue

Construction Reflections

Construction Reflection

Maritime Hotel skies

Maritime Hotel skies

Garden of Circus Delights

Every week day, on the way to work, I exit the subway at 34th Street/Penn Station and walk past one of the most beautiful and prolific subway mosaics that I’ve seen. Comprised of several panels of various sizes, The Garden of Circus Delights by ERIC FISCHLis a homage to the circus, which performs at Madison Square Garden above of the subway station.

Panoramic view of one of the panels

Panoramic view of one of the panels

Fire Breathers and Clowns

Fire Breathers and Clowns

The 34th Street/ Penn Station subway stop is perhaps one of the busiest in the city. During rush hour, the stairs, entryways and halls are often packed body to body with commuters making it hard to take in the full breadth of the mosaic series. But, in quiet moments, you can see exotic animals, clowns, fire breathers, dancing bears, jugglers and acrobats. The idea being that the mural allows a commuter to leave the ho hum day and be pulled into the circus, where he experiences the magic of the circus. On the other side of the tent, the commuter emerges from “the white light and harmony, a commuter again, but transported and transformed.”

The commuter entering the circus tent

The commuter entering the circus tent

To find the mural, you’re best bet is to enter at 34th street and 8th Ave on the East side of the intersection, and follow the stairs all the way down to the lowest level – following signs toward the platform for the Uptown and Downtown A train. The mural is on the lowest level.

Fancy dancing bears

Fancy dancing bears

Of the work, the artist says “I thought it would be amusing, to do a contemporary Dante’s Inferno, to turn commuting into a spiritual quest.” Spiritual quest or not, the murals certainly brighten my commute.  I hope you find the opportunity to experience them for yourself.

Juggler

Juggler

Animals, oh my!

Animals, oh my!

The End of the (High)Line

The Highline in New York City is a park built on the previously abandoned and disused elevated railroad tracks of the New York Central Railroad spur which runs from the Meatpacking district to Midtown West. The north end of the Highline is near my office and I love it dearly. I have spent many a lunch hour wandering the park, people watching and taking in the juxtapositions of urban sounds, construction and building with the peaceful flora and fauna of the park.

View from the southern end of the Highline

View from the southern end of the Highline

The Highline has been open since 2009, but since the opening, construction has continued to push the park northward. The final section of the park running from 30th street  and as the New York Times describes “swing[s] west from 10th Avenue toward the Hudson River…It spills into a feral grove of big-tooth aspen trees on 34th Street.” Indeed the sunsets are glorious.

Just another sunset viewed from the Highline

Just another sunset viewed from the Highline

The newest and most northern section of the Highline, has a different tone, both literally and and metaphorically, than the rest of the park. It juts what seems dangerously close to a high rise construction site, and loops post the end of the line for the trains at Penn Station. Even the path way is more industrial, with more exposed rails and rugged black top rather than the concrete pavers seen elsewhere in the park. There is a constant cacophony of drilling, hammering, horns honking, and trains chugging along.

Rugged rail walkways

Rugged rail walkways

Certainly, its less than peaceful, but it seems like the perfect end to the park. After a more peaceful and sometimes magical feeling walk through the southern sections, the end of the Highline slowly brings you back to the urban reality of midtown Manhattan.

Train terminus as viewed from the Highline

Train terminus as viewed from the Highline

Fancy Pants

As seen in midtown in line for breakfast sandwiches. Fancy pants (literally) construction worker.

Construction Worker in only the fanciest of pants

Construction Worker in only the fanciest of pants